Hot Chocolate and Ghost Building Updates

This will be a two parter on themes discussed this week.

So in my quest for hot chocolate, I found this useful article from last year. There are 11 places for the best hot chocolate in Chicago. I’ve been to four of them: Park Grill (okay, nothing to write home about), Xoco (disappointing), Mindy’s Hot Chocolate (too pretentious) and Katherine Anne Confections.

We went to Katherine Anne Confections yesterday. I am proud to announce that we have a winner. Katherine Anne’s had incredibly rich, thick sipping chocolate. It was glorious. There is 8-9 different flavors depending on your taste for sugar and spice. My partner in crime got the pumpkin which was basically like drinking liquid pumpkin pie. It was actually so rich that I couldn’t finish it, which I was okay with. It’s not cheap ($7-$8) but it was worth it. You get a choice of whipped cream or a homemade marshmallow (the caramel salt one is supreme). The people there are really nice. It was actually Katherine Anne herself who walked us through our choices and took our order. A nice touch. So my long search for good hot chocolate in Chicago is over.

Except I have to try the other 7 places on the list. And any more that come on my radar. This adventure isn’t over yet.

***

So in our adventures in West Town, I found another ghost building on Milwaukee. It’s the Niederman Furniture and Carpet Company. There doesn’t appear to be a great deal about it; many things remain unanswered. I did find an advertisement in the Jewish Advocate newspaper for The Brunswick Phonograph that lists Neiderman as a seller in November 24th, 1917.

I found another article from the 1921 Economist (Chicago edition) mentioning a recent building purchase on Milwaukee avenue that “tend[s] to support the feeling in general that Milwaukee avenue is a street of the future.” Maurice Niederman purchased 1459 (where the ghost building is) and 1461 from Henry C. Gleseke for $55,500. The article mentions the intention to use the spaces for the furniture store and move in 1923.

Anyway, this too is a quest to find a little bit more about these ghost buildings around town.

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