Part 3: Spring in Manhattan

The following day began at the Met, one of my favorite museums. It’s got an incredible collection but is rather overwhelming. I try to get into my head that we are only going to visit a few things because seeing the entire museum would be impossible.

Our first stop was a Seurat and circus exhibit. The exhibit featured Circus Sideshow, one of Seurat’s masterpieces, along with circus posters, other contemporary circus paintings, and sketches. It was nice to see some great circus posters from Cheret, a nice follow up to the Driehaus museum’s current exhibition. I was hoping for more of Seurat’s circus paintings since I’d had seen some really amazing works elsewhere but alas.

We then went to the rooftop garden at the Met. Every year they have an artist do some outdoor installation, which is always neat. This year’s piece was spectacular. Adrián Villar Rojas took 3D scans of pieces all over the museum, printed them, and created these sculptural collages. THey are laid out throughout the garden, some on tables, some freestanding. It’s called “The Theater of Disappearance.” I love juxtaposing things, like ancient Egyptian busts with animal parts or Ancient Greek torso. All while overlooking the beauty of Central Park and the NYC skyline. It could also be a great scavenger hunt, tracking down the pieces in the collection!

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We also visited the exhibit on ancient China featuring some incredible terracotta soldiers. Seeing them is always a treat. Someday I’ll make it to Xian to see the site! What I liked in particular about the exhibition was the sheer number of other artifacts that were included. There was a series of beautifully carved women dancing or playing instruments while another room featured animal sculptures. Wondrous!

After our brief visit to the museum, since any visit is brief at the Met, it was time to head to Broadway for a matinee of War Paint. To get there, we ended up passing by the Tax Rally (it was 4/15) and we saw some amazing puppets and signs. We had $1 pizza at a joint just off Times Square. Tasty tasty pizza.

War Paint is a musical about make up rivals, Helena Rubinstein and Elizabeth Arden, and their decades long feud. It was interesting to see corporate sabotage and competition played out in a musical. I’m not sure if I loved the message of the musical (you’ll just have to see it) but it definitely had some pretty neat scenes and dances.

After the play, we decided to head to a new place for us: the Morgan Library. I had come across it a few months prior and it seemed like our cup of team. It turned out that it was JP Morgan’s library. What an astonishing collection. The main library room is breathtaking. Rows and floors of books with two secret staircases taking you to the upper floors. Also, we found some pretty neat books that make you wonder about their contents!  There were some exhibitions as well on display including works by Emily Dickinson and Symbolist poets. But the rooms themselves were well worth it. It’s a research library and it made me appreciate how awesome Chicago’s own Newberry library is. Here, it’s free to check out books etc. Morgan Library requires a hefty entry ticket.

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Dinner turned into a bit of an adventure! We had reservations to Tao, a fashionable Asian cuisine place near the hotel. When we walked in, the loud overhead music enveloped us. It was all very hip looking and made me feel a bit out of place. When we sat down to eat, we learned that there was nothing, absolutely nothing, on the menu that my mom could eat. Apparently, they premake things like steaks. :-/

So we left. We found a tiny quiet Italian place called Montebello where we were the only people at the beginning of the evening. The food was tasty, we could talk, and the staff were extremely nice. They overheard me talking about how my glass of Prosecco was such much better at their place than the place from the night before so they comped us limoncello! And there were cookies too. So go to Montebello, skip Tao.

Then more adventure!  had tried calling the number on the black card from the night before but couldn’t get through for an hour. At 5pm (an hour after they opened and I started calling), I was informed that there were only taking walk-ins; they were catering to a larger party. Boo. I found the name of a speakeasy called Bathtub Gin in Chelsea that took reservations.  Bathhouse Gin was going to be the place.

We entered through a hole in the wall coffee place, serving as the coatroom. As soon as we stepped in, the noise rose up like a wall. Loud pounding music. But we trekked on. We had a little table and ordered from their cocktail menu, which is always a hit or miss. One thing was a sure fire hit though: s’mores. It wasn’t going to be high quality chocolate or marshmallows but we couldn’t resist. They actually brought us an open brazier with Hershey’s chocolate, graham crackers, and marshmallows. It was amazing. We even convinced the table next to us to do it too.

Plus there was a golden bathtub that you can get into. And we totally took photos lounging in the bathtub. Because golden bathtub!

That’s all for now!

You Are Beautiful

A few weeks ago, I had the pleasure of interviewing Matthew Hoffman, the creator and “custodian” of You Are Beautiful. You’ve probably seen the little silver sticker with the words “You Are Beautiful” around Chicago or seen the large signs popping up on fences with the same message.

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ES: How would you describe the work you do?

MH: I like to call it public installation or public art.

ES: Do you consider yourself a street artist?

MH: Definitely in the early day, all the stuff was done without permission. [I’d] call some of what we do street art  but it’s also arts in community, community art/public art, where we are getting neighborhoods chamber commerce [involved]. It’s work in the public and work in the street.

ES: You’ve mentioned how you were committed to be anonymous early on in part to keep the focus on the project rather than yourself. Was there any desire to keep anonymous due to legality of it?

MH: All the installs I was doing initially, I was doing something 100% legal, making the community a little more beautiful, definitely adding to it. Many works were large words in wood screwed into the sides of boarded up buildings or two inch tape. I did a lot of different messages, not just “You are Beautiful.”

ES: Could you talk about how you got from your initial sticker to the final design with the Helvetica font?

MH: I’m definitely someone who believes in making, doing, and refining. You can easily hide and keep it in a sketchbook forever. I take things and get them out even if they are rough. My feedback and other people’s feedback refine it from there. The initial ones were absolutely horrible. It took a bunch of trials with different ideas, with different stickers [to get to the final version]. It took somewhere from 6 months to a year.

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ES: Why stickers?

MH: Stickers? Who doesn’t love stickers? There are a lot of fun, versatile, not messy. I have done wheatpastes and not enjoyed it. Stickers stick to anything. You can have a whole pack in your pocket. In 2002, when the sticker culture really exploding, all these kids started trading stickers, mailing each other stickers. It was an interesting way to interact with people on global scale; you put theirs up, they put yours up, and then send photos. It was a cool way to collaborate with other people.

ES: Much of your work focuses on words and lettering. Why are you drawn to lettering?

MH: I studied graphic design. I learned a lot of visual language, sharing your ideas, being able to tell your story. I love typography; there’s a lot you can to do with it. Words can be very simple or appear to be simple but you can read into them. It can mean a lot of things depending on how you read it inside your head.

ES: How does it feel that it has its own life – 3 million printed as of February 2017?

MH: We’re up to 3.75 million [as of June 1st]. We are doing a big show in September so there will be another printing before that, 4 million with that order. It’s super cool how the community has really surrounded the project and the message. It’s a great feeling to know so many people think the same way you do. It’s fun making a difference in the world. That’s pretty crazy.

ES: You describe yourself as the custodian of “You Are Beautiful.” Could you elaborate?

MH: Somebody has to keep the lights on and the floor clean; There’s a lot of thankless work to get everything going. The project is taking a life of its own; there is a community that can do way more than any one person can do.

ES: Where is the best place you’ve seen a sticker?

MH: I had never been Minneapolis. We went last year for a wedding. As we were walking to the art museum, there was a four lane road with a median and a sign between where we were and the art museum. I got sticker out of my pocket to put it there but when I got there and looked up, I saw there was already one. It was really funny. It’s one of my favorite placements.

ES: Could you talk a little about your woodworking?

MH: The Cliff notes version of that was I was always a tinkerer as a little kid. I made junk creations; I never knew much about art or understood it. In middle school, I took classes in woodworking (and metal) and loved woodworking. I learned how to do all sorts of things, built furniture. In my  last year in high school, I took courses of graphic arts, photography, computer programs, [and went to] school for graphic design. I feel like all those things have come together into what I do now.

ES: For two of your projects, you took people’s input and made them into wood pieces. You mentioned in a different interview that you felt like you were “helping people tell their stories.” Could you talk a little bit about that?

MH:  That was a fun  project. It’s been on the back burner. It’s fun sort of collaborating with people. If they are already coming to you, they have an idea from past works and know what they are looking to expect. It is interesting what comes out of that.

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ES: I wanted to ask about the shows for “You Are Beautiful” at Galerie F. Could you talk about that?

MH: I absolutely love collaboration. I have to let go and things happen that are unexpected, which can surprise you, good and bad. Most of time, it is really good. We are working on another show for November.

ES: There are other campaigns that have gone on like “Anything is Possible,” “Love,” etc. Could you talk about them? Do you have a favorite?

MH: I really like “Go for It.” It’s one of my favorite, how it looks, how it came together. It was a lot of fun. I’d never made anything like that. There was a lot of feeling of community while working on it. It made me feel really good [that] it was only supposed to be up for a couple months but it’s been a couple of years. People enjoyed it so much that it keeps on living.

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ES: Could you talk about your show in the fall?

MH: There will be a show in mid-September. We are working hard on it, figuring out what it is. It’s a process. We’ll be completely taking over a space, basically to play around… at a warehouse in conjunction with ART EXPO.

Thanks to Matthew Hoffman and everyone who makes “You are Beautiful” possible. Check out their website https://you-are-beautiful.com/ for more details about the upcoming shows in mid-September and November.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Part 2: Spring in Manhattan

The second half of our day took us to the southern part of Manhattan. My mom had wanted to check out the Oculus, the new transport station that was part of the World Trade Center network. The building is out of science fiction – weirdly shaped and white. Inside, there are several floors with high end shops and as far as we could tell, one restaurant/cafe. Very odd. It was a dramatic place architecturally but I’m still confused how you can have a massive transportation depot without food.

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After our tour of the space, we headed to Trinity Church nearby. Inside we found beautiful wooden carved chapel and windows. Outside, we discovered that this was where Alexander and Eliza Hamilton were buried. However, it took some time finding their grave. We learned that there are burial grounds on both sides of church. When we paid our respects to his grave, the lady next to us starting singing the section about Eliza from “Who Lives, Who Dies, Who Tells Your Story.” Her grave had pennies all over it as well. Nice touch.

We passed by the Bull of Wall Street and the Little Girl standing him down. There was a line of mostly women waiting to get their photo taken with the Little Girl. I declined getting my photo taken since it was a long line of chaos.

We then went to the National Museum of the American Indian next to Bowling Green Park. The museum is housed in the Alexander Hamilton U.S. Custom House, which is a pretty astonishing building. Big rotunda with murals. We learned from the guard that Bowling Green Park’s fence went back to colonial times; on the fence, there used to be symbols of the crown that revolutionaries had sawed off! Plus there was an amazing plaque talking about how the rental of the park was only a peppercorn. Back in the day, peppercorn was a big deal.

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I had read about the museum and its current exhibition “Native Fashion Now” in the New York Times a few weeks earlier so I was keen to check it out. They had gone to Native American designers to showcase their work in the show. It was spectacular. For instance, there were these high heeled boots covered in beadwork with hummingbird motif by Jamie Okuma. Another was a kimono that depicted ledger art by Toni Williams. Astonishing. They also had a quiver made in the famous Louis Vuitton fabric. Or a pair of moccasins made from electrical parts. Innovative and astonishing.

The permanent collection had some pretty spectacular objects from a diverse number of groups. There were drums from Mapuche in Chile all the way up to various groups in the Pacific Northwest. They even had a room set aside for Native American Contemporary art where there was a paper jingle dress.

Another special exhibition included pottery from Central America, which was a treat. As I have gotten older, I have grown to love pottery, especially from Latin America. I love all the pots of local animals!

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We then walked from the museum to the Strand, not a small walk. It was delightful wandering around the city. I enjoyed all the street art, as per usual. The Strand was great as always. We met up with a good friend and my parents at a Spanish restaurant in Greenwich Village.

Afterwards, we wandered with our friend to find a speakeasy. There is a trend in bars in NY (and elsewhere) of speakeasies that are accessed in unusual places. The first place we tried involved going through a toy store. Sadly, it was merely a shelf of toys and the bar was extremely crowded and loud.

We then began our trek to find an available place. There was another one that involved going into a phone booth in a hole-in-the-wall hot dog stand. When we got there, there was a line, so it wasn’t truly hidden. When it was our time to get to the front of the line, a man pulled back a wall of the phone booth and I could peer inside. It was a quiet bar with a taxidermied pheasant on the wall. We were informed it was a three hour wait, which wasn’t happening. He ended up handing my friend and I a black business card with a number and the name of the address. Someday we’ll go.

Ultimately we ended up a regular bar, notably only for the strange channel it showed of people embarrassing themselves by doing stupid things. It wasn’t “Funniest Home Videos” but it was an actual channel that bars can request. Strange.

That’s all for now!